Favole di Luce

Favole di Luce

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Monte Orlando

Monte Orlando

le falesie

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Monte Orlando

Monte Orlando

Mausoleo Lucio Munazio Planco

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Buone Feste

Buone Feste

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Gaeta

Gaeta il castello Angioino ed Aragonese

un museo a cielo aperto

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Gaeta

Gaeta Campanile Cattedrale S. Erasmo

Un paese di storia e arte

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Simon Altmann about Scipione Pulzone

an interview by journalist Andrea Brengola

2 Quadro dell'Immacolata

Portrait of Immaculate Conception, Scipione Pulzone (1582)

Gaeta, SS. Annunziata, golden Chapel

Scipione Pulzone
Born 1544 Gaeta, Kingdom of Naples
Died February 1, 1598 Rome
Nationality Neapolitan
Known for painting

Scipione Pulzone (1544 – February 1, 1598), also known as Il Gaetano, was a Neapolitan painter of the late Italian Renaissance. His work differs in several respects from the Mannerist predominant at the time. He was active mainly in Rome, but also worked in Naples and Florence. It is thought that he studied under Jacopino del Conte in Rome.

Best known for his portraits, Pulzone painted Pope Gregory XIII, Cardinal de' Medici and Francesco I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, Eleanor de' Medici, and Marie de' Medici. He also painted an Assumption with the Apostles for San Silvestro al Quirinale; a Pietà for the Gesù; and a Crucifixion for Santa Maria in Vallicella.

Pulzone's Mater Divinae Providentiae, painted around 1580, inspired the Roman Catholic cult of devotion to Our Lady of Providence.

Biography
Born in Gaeta around 1550 and initially trained in the workshop of Jacopino del Conte, Pulzone was one of the most original pictorial interpreters of the age of the Counter Reformation and one of the most esteemed artists active in Rome in the second half of the 16th century. Many of his works, and especially the religious paintings, betray the marked influence of Girolamo Siciolante da Sermoneta. He excelled above all in portraiture, displaying particularly high artistic quality in the rendering of details. He worked at the Neapolitan and Florentine courts as well as in Rome, where he also painted the portraits of the popes of his day, namely Pius V and Gregory XIII. His major religious works included the Our Lady of the Assumption in the church of San Silvestro al Quirinale and the Christ on the Cross with Saints in Santa Maria in Vallicella in Rome.

Scipione Pulzone (1544 – February 1, 1598), also known as Il Gaetano, was a Neapolitan painter of the late Italian Renaissance. His work differs in several respects from the Mannerist predominant at the time. He was active mainly in Rome, but also worked in Naples and Florence. It is thought that he studied under Jacopino del Conte in Rome.

Best known for his portraits, Pulzone painted Pope Gregory XIII, Cardinal de' Medici and Francesco I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, Eleanor de' Medici, and Marie de' Medici. He also painted an Assumption with the Apostles for San Silvestro al Quirinale; a Pietà for the Gesù; and a Crucifixion for Santa Maria in Vallicella.

Pulzone's Mater Divinae Providentiae, painted around 1580, inspired the Roman Catholic cult of devotion to Our Lady of Providence.

Scipione Pulzone: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scipione_Pulzone 

Simon Altmann about Scipione Pulzone: https://youtu.be/RcKUCkNEJxg

SIMON LEONARDO ALTMANN
I was born in Buenos Aires in 1924 but went to London in 1949 to do a PhD in the Department of Theoretical Physics under Professor C. A. Coulson. When I returned to the University of Buenos Aires in 1952 the job of Senior Demonstrator I had had before going to London was not renewed because I refused to join the Peronista party. Charles Coulson, who in the meantime had been appointed to a Chair in the Mathematical Institute at Oxford, then invited me to join him there as his research assistant. I arrived in Oxford with my wife and first son Daniel in March 1953 and remained there for five years: when Perón was ousted in 1957 great pressure was applied on me to return to Buenos Aires to help re-established the University. So, I was professor of Chemical Physics in BA and member of the University Council for one year and then returned to Oxford University, where I became Lecturer in the Theory of Metals in 1959 and in 1964 Fellow and Lecturer in Mathematical Physics at Brasenose College. In 1991 I became its Vice Principal and then retired as an Emeritus Fellow of the College. I have published eight books, some 70 scientific papers and a few poems. I have also attended poetry workshops at Oxford and London for some eight years and have being a visiting professor in many European and USA Universities.
http://www.simonaltmann.com/Simon_Altmann/Welcome.html